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October 15, 2002

1. Call to Order

Mayor Brian Krajewski called the regular meeting of the Village Council of the Village of Downers Grove to order at 6:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of the Downers Grove Village Hall.

Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag

Mayor Krajewski led those present in the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag.

2. Roll Call

Present: Commissioner Michael Gilbert, Commissioner Thomas Sisul, Commissioner Marilyn Schnell, Commissioner Martin Tully, Commissioner Mark Zabloudil and Mayor Brian Krajewski Non Voting: Village Manager Riccardo Ginex, Village Attorney Enza Petrarca and Village Clerk April Holden Commissioner Gilbert arrived at 6:35 p.m.

3. Minutes of Workshop and Council Meetings

Council Meeting – October 1, 2002 Workshop Meeting – October 8, 2002 There being no additions or corrections to the minutes, Mayor Krajewski said they would be filed as submitted.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Staff Introduction

Mayor Krajewski introduced the Village’s new Staff Attorney, Ann Marie Perez. Ms. Perez worked for the DuPage County State’s Attorney’s office for 10-1/2 years, and for 1-1/2 years in private practice in the firm of Kubiesa and Gosselar, former Village Attorneys.

Proclamation

The Mayor proclaimed the week of October 14-19, 2002 as GFWC Illinois Junior Woman’s Club week in the Village. He then presented the Proclamation to the Junior Woman’s Club.

Beth McInerney of the Junior Woman’s Club announced that February 28 would be the 4th annual Taste of the Town in the Signature Room at Seven Bridges in Woodridge. She said this is one of their major fund raising events for the year. The Mayor thanked them for the work they do in the community.

Open Burning Ordinance

The Mayor noted that Item 7 of the Active Agenda concerning the Amendment to the Open Burning Provision has been removed from the agenda for this evening. It will be referred back to the Public Safety Committee for discussion. He said there appears to be confusion as to the existing ordinance which prohibits burning of any kind with the exception of cooking food. He further explained that all ordinance fines vary between $50-$75 for a violation.

4.Public Hearings

Proposed Amendment to the Downtown Tax Increment Financing and Redevelopment Project Area, Project, and Plan Mayor Krajewski called the public hearing to order at 6:40 p.m. This public hearing has been called by the Village Council to consider the approval of an amendment to the redevelopment plan and project for and the designation of a redevelopment project area known as the “Downers Grove Central Business District Redevelopment Project Area.”

On August 20 2002, the Village Council adopted Resolution No. 2002-76 entitled, “A RESOLUTION CALLING FOR A PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER THE FIRST AMENDMENT OF THE DOWNTOWN TAX INCREMENT FINANCING AND REDEVELOPMENT PROJECT AREA , PROJECT, AND PLAN .” Notice of this hearing was published in the Downers Grove Reporter on September 20 and 27, 2002. On September 23, 2002, copy of this notice was mailed to the person or persons in whose name the general taxes for the last preceding year were paid on each lot, block, tract, or parcel lying within the project redevelopment area. In the event taxes for the last preceding year were not paid, this notice was mialed to the persons last listed on the tax rolls within the preceding three years as the owner of property.

As part of Resolution No. 2002-76, a Joint Review Board was established which met on September 12, 2002. Notice of Resolution No. 2002-76 and the convening of the Joint Review Board was sent to each community college district, local elementary school district and high school district, park district, library district, Township and the County on August 3, 2002. A resolution has been signed and submitted by the Joint Review Board which is made a part of the record of this hearing.

A proposed amended redevelopment plan has been on file with the office of the Village Clerk since August 9, 2002.

The Mayor reviewed the procedures for the hearing. He asked the Village Clerk if any objections had been filed.

Village Clerk April Holden said she received one written comment entering the following objections: 1) The existing public/Village Hall property does not meet requirements for inclusion in the tax increment financing program as detailed in the “Tax Increment Allocation Redevelopment Act,” and 2) Amended Plan Estimated Project Costs of $68,250,000 lack a realistic expectation of being offset by incremental TIF revenues.

The Mayor then asked Village Manager Rick Ginex to make the presentation.

Manager Ginex asked Mr. Phil McKenna to begin the presentation.

Phil McKenna said he was President of Kane, McKenna and Associates, who are consultants for the Village regarding the TIF District. The amendment under consideration is fairly small in size and scope, to include the amendment of the boundaries. The total amount of additional assessed valuation being taken in is $71,000 which is less than 1/2 of 1% of the initial equalized assessed valuation. Mr. McKenna said the second amendment is a budgetary amendment. He noted that the TIF was formed in 1997, and there have been tremendous improvements to the downtown area since the inception of the TIF . The proposed amendments take a step further in terms of inclusion of property and budget estimate of the equalized assessed value. To amend the TIF district, they must look at the district as a whole and whether it qualifies. Additional the TIF Act requires the current equalized assessed valuation of the area and the EAV must be projected out over a period of 20 years. Mr. McKenna said the estimate is based upon present factors, explaining that it is difficult to predict 20 years ahead, but $63 million is the projected amount in 20 years.

Mr. McKenna said there was public meeting held on July 31 for taxing districts and residents within 750 feet of the boundary area under consideration. The meeting was held in the Council Chambers and questions were addressed at that meeting. Mr. McKenna said that taxing districts, such as school districts, often have objections to the TIF financing. The Resolution which was adopted was adopted unanimously in support of the District by all taxing agencies.

Mr. McKenna said that as a result of the proposed changes there are about five ripple effects, which he asked Mr. Bob Richlicki to describe.

Mr. Richlicki, Kane, McKenna and Associates, pointed out five critical elements of the amendments: 1) housekeeping to note that the activities would not dislocate more than ten residential units; 2) modification of the legal description; 3) modification of maps; 4) adjustments made to the budget; and 5) modification of the estimated EAV .

Mayor Krajewski said that in addition to the required meetings that the Village conducts, he and staff met with school board members of Districts 58 and 99, and the PTA Presidents, as well as the Board of Directors of the Chamber of Commerce, the Downtown Management Board, and the Joint Review Board, where a PowerPoint presentation was made. The Joint Review Board made a unanimous recommendation to move ahead with the amendment. He noted some of the comments made by the representatives at those meetings.

The Mayor again reviewed the proposal on the agenda to amend the current TIF which was put in place in 1997. A PowerPoint presentation was made giving more detailed explanations to the amendments. The presentation showed the proposed slight modification to the boundaries to include additional streets, capture the proposed Station Crossing site which was omitted in the original 1997 TIF , and incorporate the Civic Center/Village Hall area into the TIF for potential conversion of that property. He stressed that no TIF funds would be used for any redevelopment of the municipal buildings. The Mayor said that the apartment building at 904 Curtiss is the only taxable piece of property and will come into the TIF with a current assessed value of $71,870.

Regarding the budget amendment, the Mayor said they are proposing to increase it from $15 million in 1997 to $68 million in 2002. The Curtiss parking area will be redeveloped in conjunction with the development of the Village’s parking structure. He noted certain incompatible uses in a downtown such as an auto body repair and storage business, the printing shop, the old Reporter building, and the Post Office Distribution Center. Examples of private development include Toon Funeral Home renovation, One Smooth Stone, the Warren Avenue auto repair shop at Washington and Warren, and the Irish Pub in the Grove Premium building.

The Mayor said that in 1997 $16 million was the EAV , and the current EAV projection for 2020 is $90 million, which does not include private development projections. There could be an EAV projection of $120 million in 2020. He described the effect of the TIF on School District 58 as an example of how it would benefit.

Mayor Krajewski said long term benefits from the benefits to the TIF improvements include long-term enhancements of street conditions, additional stormwater improvement, an expansion of shopping choices, and a revitalized civic center. Taxing bodies will receive a substantial revenue windfall at the TIF closing.

The Mayor reported on some projects underway including Georgian Courts with 17 units sold to date, Station Crossing has projected sales of two units per month, however 36 units have already been sold.

Commissioner McConnell commented that $68 million gives the capacity and flexibility to do a number of things yet to be decided, and this will be an opportunity for discussion on potential development.

Commissioner Tully asked at what point would it be appropriate to begin discussion regarding an agreement with District 58 regarding the $13,000 rebate.

Brian Pabst, Deputy Village Manger of Operations, said that negotiations could begin almost immediately.

The Mayor them opened discussion to the public.

George Swimmer, 4905 Main Street, said he has property within the TIF district and has noted that property values have gone up. He does have some concerns, however, including traffic flow and increased residents to the downtown area. He thinks streets could be made more user friendly. He said he also feels the north side of the tracks is getting far less attention than the south side of the tracks, particularly with regard to parking.

The Mayor said the Village is working with METRA to turn the existing lots into shopper parking.

Mr. Swimmer said he noticed that the pedestrian underpass funding was taken out and hoped that would be revisited. The Mayor said it would have been nice to have done it when the road construction was underway.

Mr. Swimmer then wished Commissioners Gilbert and Sisul good luck.

There being no further discussion on the proposed amendments, upon a Motion by Commissioner Sisul, seconded by Commissioner Gilbert and passed unanimously, Mayor Krajewski adjourned the public hearing at 7:18 p.m.

5.Public Comments and Questions

A. Comments and Questions on Active Agenda

1. Timothy McJoynt, 1420 Grant, said he was the attorney representing Skuddlebutts, and wanted to comment on the Belmont Site Plan. He said that the proposed new site plan is saving Skuddlebutts, but he is concerned that the configuration may isolate them.

2. Patti Paczkowski, 7421 Main Street, said she was there to discuss the increased fines on the skateboarding issue. She said that parents are concerned about their children who skate the streets of Downers Grove. She opposed the labeling of the children as vandals, and the statement that children are not being disciplined. The reason for repeat offenders is not because the fines are affordable, but because there is no other place for the children to skate. The Indian Boundary hours are not appropriate, and there is no place for legal skating by the children. Some years ago a petition was signed to request a skate park but the petition was denied. An article in a recent Chicago Tribune said that officials have discovered that skate parks are not so bad. It is the third most popular sport amongst youngsters, trailing basketball and soccer. In the past month, five skate parks have opened in surrounding communities, and they have been successful. Ms. Paczkowski said that a fine increase is a bandaid solution to the problem, and the parents are willing with work with the agencies for a skateboard park.

The Mayor said the Village will forward on comments about the skate parks to the Park District. He said the businessmen are concerned about the damage in the downtown area, and that is why skateboarding is prohibited in the downtown area. It is a function of the Park District to provide those types of facilities. He said the Council’s intent is to stop the damage in the business area.

Commissioner Tully said the purpose of the fine is to target those that are causing the repeated damage. The absence of a skatepark is not a license to cause damage.

The Mayor said the Village must consider the safety factor as well. The downtown area wasn’t designed as a obstacle course of a skatepark.

3. Betty Rigsby, 1962 Hitchcock, said she attended the Belmont underpass meeting some time ago. There was no mention at that time of taking the 1970 Hitchcock lot as part of that property. The owner has never been contacted and it is a prime piece of land. She said Skuddlebutts also made no improvements because they were told they would be taken. Ms. Rigsby said Skuddlebutts will be left as an island, and Metra is entering a residential area. Ms. Rigsby said that this requires an extension of the frontage road. She discussed the traffic effect and the impact of the plan on many homes up to Glenview and Curtiss. The residents want the underpass; however, the problem is that they moving into the residential area and the homeowners have not even been contacted.

The Mayor said that the issue of a left turn onto Hitchcock has been raised. He said this evening they are discussing the Intergovernmental Agreement regarding the funding of the project. There will be many discussions over the next two years on the actual design of the roads. He said the road will be transferred to the County. The Mayor said the Village will control the parking lots when this is done. He said he raised the concern about contacting the owners and asked the Village Manager to follow up on that. He is aware of the concerns.

4. Terri Brzezinski, 2219 Haddow, said that there is also an item on the agenda for a Motion to vote on one of the two plans for the Belmont underpass. She asked that the Council not vote on the plans proposed at this time because of the concerns of the northwest corner parking lot. They are concerned about the safety for the school children and the general neighborhood around the parking area. Metra’s own feasibility study indicated any increased traffic on Haddow would put the students of Puffer School at risk and negatively impact the residents. Ms. Brzezinski said although at one point residents were told a traffic light would be put at the intersection, apparently there are no plans for a stop light at this time.

The Mayor said in the Metra report on the underpass, there is a traffic signal planned for Haddow and Belmont in the initial phase of construction.

Ms. Brzezinski said the traffic light does not address the concern about the increased traffic flow on Haddow and Puffer. In March Metra said a federal law required replacement of the parking lot, but has not produced documentation of the law which she said does not exist. Ms. Brzezinski said that Metra is becoming greedy at the expense and risk to residents’ children and families. She recommended moving the parking lot from the northwest to the northeast side. The parking lot is not a necessary component of the underpass project.

Mayor Krajewski said it was pointed out at meetings with IDOT and Metra that Council suggestions will increase costs and may eliminate the entire project. Ms. Brzezinski said it would not cost any more to move the parking lot, and the Mayor responded that when the Village discussed a move of just a few feet with Metra they responded that it would result in an additional cost of $400,000.

5. George Swimmer, 4905 Main Street, said he was a member of the Belmont Underground Task Force, and the DuPage Railroad Safety Council. He said that in 3-1/2 years they came up with $365 million. The Village will not be required to provide funding to the project. The project will improve safety in the area, improve traffic flow, and will decrease the amount of time for emergency vehicles to get Good Samaritan Hospital. Mr. Swimmer said this would not have been accomplished if the Mayor had not put together the Task Force. The money is now available. Mr. Swimmer said the Maple Avenue will at some point have an underpass and he would like to see the Task Force remain in place to focus on the Maple Avenue crossing in the future. He said the underpass would be a wonderful legacy to Mayor Krajewski’s position as Mayor.

The Mayor said the Village has had discussions with the Burlington Northern on Maple Avenue, and that would be a less expensive venture.

6. Mary Hofman, 5914 Webster, said she was opposed to the increase in skateboarding fines. She resented the newspaper article calling the children vandals. Although she realizes there is a problem in the downtown area and the 75th Street area, she does not think the fine will solve the problem. She asked that the Village Council and Park District work together to find a solution to the problem.

The Mayor said that the Village will contact the Park District, and he encouraged the speakers to attend the upcoming Park District meetings regarding this issue.

Ms. Hofman said that the Village is not in keeping with the times by not providing a place for children to go to skateboard. She asked that they consider a skatepark and involve the skaters in the planning. She said that the parking lot at the Lincoln Center could be considered and asked that the Village help the residents work with the Park District.

The Mayor said it is difficult for the Council to tell the Park District how to manage its programs. He said he hopes the residents will go to the Park District. Ms. Hofman noted that Elmhurst originally had a temporary skatepark to see how it would work and it was successful.

Ms. Hofman said that it would be nice to have a spot in the downtown area for them to go. She asked that the Council hold off on this vote this evening.

Commissioner Tully said that this is a Park District issue. They are elected by the citizens to reflect and implement their park and recreation needs. He said the Council will convey the requests made by the residents to the Park District, however; the Park District was elected for the sole purpose to implement the recreation needs of the residents. The Lincoln Center is owned by the Park District and not the Village. He said the Council will be happy to work with the residents in whatever way it can, but the initiative must come from the residents.

Ms. Hofman asked that the Village Council take the item off the agenda and hold it for six months. There was not much warning to the public on this matter.

7. Several young skaters came forward regarding the skateboarding issue. One of the young men asked about the police practice of allowing people to ride bicycles on the streets or in park areas, but they will kick the kids out of Fishel Park just for being there, even if they’re not riding bikes. He wanted to know why the police did this. Another young person said that a newspaper article said there was drinking behind Fishel Park. The first young man said that often the youngsters are falsely accused and yelled at by business people and by the police without reason. He said that sometimes they are ticketed for walking with the skateboards even though they are not skating, and they are followed around at night. A second youngster said a skatepark would prevent damage from occurring. The first skater said that he cannot see all of the damage and most of it would be on the curbs.

The Mayor said that in front of Downers Grove National Bank there was $30,000 worth of damage.

8. Donna Retzlaff, 211 S. Cass, Westmont, said her parents live at 1970 Hitchcock and received a letter Saturday and were unable to participate in the Workshop on Tuesday. The Mayor explained that the discussion at the Workshop was on the Intergovernmental Agreement. Ms. Retzlaff asked if they planned underground detention at the 1970 Hitchcock property, and the Mayor said he thought that would be possible. She asked if Metra representatives were present as they never returned her parents’ call. She also asked what would happen if the land was condemned. Her parents have lived there for 53 years and this is no small matter to them. The Mayor asked her to leave her number with the Village Attorney. She said that at another meeting with Metra they were told that in order to acquire their property, the parents would have to be a willing seller as the land could not be condemned.

9. Collette Wrona, 1033 Grove, lives near Fishel Park. She said she represents the other point of view regarding the skateboarding. She mentioned that all of the parking lots in town are private property, and the skateboarders are trespassing. Ms. Wrona said there have never been so many people hanging out in the lots doing nothing. She thinks there is drug trafficking in that area, and the garbage is unbelievable. There is a car that goes back and forth that the neighbors recognize. Ms. Wrona said that the parents should be fined more than their children. She has also seen youngsters on top of Carlson’s roof as well as other garage roofs. One boy told her he had already fallen seven times. Ms. Wrona said that Fishel Park has just become a hangout. She said they never had this type of behavior in the area before. She said 90% of the people hanging out are not skateboarders. She suggested having drug-sniffing dogs work in that area. People are afraid to go to the bank. Ms. Wrona said that the police claim they can’t issue too many tickets, but the residents never see the police.

10. Robert Packowski, 7421 Main Street, said he was the father of a skateboarder. He said he understood the concerns about damage being done, and if his son were caught doing damage he would be totally responsible for the damage, as should any skateboarder. His son has received some $10 tickets for skateboarding, but not doing damage. He said that perhaps they need to step-up the control. He recommended that there be no firm $75 fine, but instead a graduated fine. Those who have been caught doing damage should be fined $75 and more if applicable. The Mayor explained that the Village does not have the capability of charging a graduated fee.

11. Regina Shearer, 1964 Hitchcock, said she lives next door to 1970 Hitchcock. She is concerned that there be a privacy fence as she will be living next door to a parking lot. She also has concerns about the traffic. People who do not live in the area do not understand the traffic that is generated by commuter parking, Skuddlebutts restaurant, and the VFW . Additional parking on 1970 would just add to the problem.

The Mayor said that the parking lot next to Skuddlebutts is used as commuter parking as they are on private property and do not have to comply to Village rules. Once those are converted to new parking, they will have to comply to Village requirements.

Ms. Shearer said she would like to see the traffic go down Belmont, and not Hitchcock. It’s hard to get onto Belmont now. She is concerned about the traffic on Hitchcock.

12. Three young men, Dan, Kevin and Scott, said they are skateboarders. They said there are curbs at Toys R Us at Four Corners that have been there for years. Bikers cause the damage to the curbs. One of the boys said it seems like they’re trying to find reasons to give teenagers tickets. He wanted to know where the money is going. The Mayor said that last year’s damage at the bank alone was $30,000. He said they are not looking to cover the cost of the damage with the tickets. One of the boys said that the parks have areas to walk and playgrounds, however there’s nothing for the teens. He asked that they mention this to the Park District.

The Mayor said that the Village Council can inform the Park District of what has been said, however, it is better if the residents themselves appear at the meetings and tell the Park District that they represent the public, and the residents want a skatepark.

One of the boys said that he’s been paying $10 once or twice a week for two years now, and he doesn’t think $75 will solve the problem either.

13. Sue Petkus, 1049 Grove, said she noticed the increase in loitering in Fishel Park. She said that the increase does have something to do with the skateboarding, and suggested that the parents who think their kids are being harassed come and step into the shoes of the residents. Residents are afraid to go the park. There are problems such as porta-potties being knocked over, trash bins knocked over, fires are started, and the vulgar language can be heard all around. She noted that the woman who gave information to the Reporter newspaper refused to give her name because she was afraid. She agreed that kids need a place to go and skate. Ms. Petkus said however, that allowing this to continue is counterproductive to retaining and attracting new business.

The Mayor said that there have been complaints from people about problems, however, he noted that 90% of the teens are not causing the problems. The minority are ruining it for the others. Ms. Petkus agreed with that comment.

Commissioner Sisul said that bicycles are covered under this fine as well.

14. Paul Brzezinski, 2219 Haddow, said he understood the Council would be voting on both the Intergovernmental Agreement, as well as one of two plans. He said he is for the underpass project as are many of the residents. However, they are concerned about Metra and their attitude toward the residential neighborhoods. The residents are looking for the Council to represents their interests in this project, and he feels that is not being done now. He said it is unfair for them to be asked to vote on the plans tonight.

The Mayor said the Council was aware of the concerns of the residents. Mr. Brzezinski then asked that the Council not vote on the design motion, and instead tell Metra what the residents want.

The Mayor said that the residents want the underpass; however, it is not possible to please all of the residents. Mr. Brzezinski asked that they find a way to minimize the effects of the underpass on the residents. The Mayor said the Council has to weigh what can be done to meet as many of the wishes of the residents as is possible, but he said they cannot please all of them. He said until the Intergovernmental Agreement is done, they cannot transfer the road to the County and may also lose IDOT funding if this doesn’t go forward. That could result in no underpass at all.

Mr. Brzezinski asked whether the Council could vote on a resolution to take positive proactive action in regard to the condemnations. The Mayor said that is what they are supposed to do and the Council will be involved as the negotiations go forward. He said that the cost has already gone from $24 to $36.5 million due in part to the money spent for land acquisition.

Commissioner Schnell commented about things the Council can do to work with the residents and with Metra. She said that the Council is aware of the need for the traffic signal. She noted that as the process goes on, things such as landscaping and screening for residents is important to the Council as well as the residents. The first step, however, is to sign the agreement. She said that the Council wants to work with the residents on this project.

Commissioner McConnell said that a letter received by the Council dated September 23 stated that moving the parking lot was not feasible. She said that is apparently not what Terri was told yesterday, and asked whether they can get more in writing from them. The Mayor said that to make it feasible they would have to acquire more land on the northeast side.

15. Steve Petkus, 1049 Grove, said he wanted to see the skateboarding fine increased to $75. The fact is that the Ordinance is already in place prohibiting skateboarding in certain areas for very legitimate reasons including public safety and safety of property. The only way they can eliminate the safety issue is to make skateboarding unattractive in certain areas. He sympathizes that there is no where else to go, but that is not the issue. They are breaking the law. He said $10 is a small price to pay and they will continue to do it. He added that he is fairly certain that most of the skateboarders are not vandals; however, there are those who put property at risk and intrude upon the privacy of residents. He noted it is especially loud when they skate in the band shell and the sound reverberates throughout the neighborhood.

B. Comments and Questions on General Matters

The Mayor called upon anyone wishing to comment on general matters, noting that many people were present to discuss the Ordinance regarding outdoor burning. He explained that the Village’s current ordinance prohibits any burning unless they are cooking food. There have been some problems with residents burning garbage, leaves, sticks, etc. He said the Ordinance will be referred back to committee and will not be voted on tonight. He thanked those residents who e-mailed the Council and staff regarding this ordinance.

1. John Collins, 6024 Ridge Court, thanked the Council for removing the open burning amendment from tonight’s active agenda. He asked the Village to review the ordinances from surrounding communities and propose an ordinance for responsible, recreational burning. They are not seeking open burning; however, they like to build campfires to share with children and friends. Their backyards are an extension of their homes.

Commissioner Tully said that in Spring 2001 the Council considered an amendment that would allow the burning of approved wood in approved containers for recreational fires. The groundswell response to today’s ordinance will bring greater review to the ordinance under consideration.

The Mayor said that Elmhurst has a good model ordinance which the Village has a copy of, as well as others.

Commissioner Sisul said he learned that there is a significant part of the community with asthma and other breathing conditions that could be affected by this ordinance. They must be cognizant of all of the problems that can result and all the people who can be affected.

Commissioner Schnell said that there is a community that has dovetailed that concern into the ordinance, so that if there is a resident in the community there is a provision to notify that person or make other accommodations.

2. Terry Madden, 920 60th Place, said he is a professional firefighter and a part-time fire inspector. He said that he called the Fire Prevention Bureau and they did not know of this ordinance or plans to amend it. He said they also did not know of any violations. He said he knows the Fire Prevention Bureau uses the BOCA Code. Regarding open burning, it is a wide spectrum. They need to look at the idea of bonfires, or other recreational fires. Those fires are clearly defined in BOCA . Regarding pollutants, Mr. Madden explained the difference between outdoor and indoor fireplaces. He said that outdoor fireplaces are cleaner burning than indoor. He said the police should be given the power to decide who is in violation.

3. Anna Peckhart, 1078 61st Street, said that every summer they enjoy recreational fires outdoors where they roast s’mores and share stories. She said if they take this away she will have no campfire memories to enjoy as an adult.

4. Shannon Madden, 920 60th Place, said that recreational fires are fun and a way to be with the family. They are not as expensive as fireplaces, and without campfires they could not enjoy their gatherings.

5. Emily Peckhart, 1078 61st Street, said that her family gets together every summer and enjoys recreational fires.

6. Liz Slayton, 4710 Wallbank, said that on September 17 she attended a Council meeting regarding an ongoing stormwater problem. She spoke with Jack Bajor on September 20 and he promised to get her an answer. On October 1 she spoke with Mr. Bajor and Mr. John Hall and asked that something be resolved to eliminate the need for homeowners to spend funds to resolve the situations. She said options were discussed. On October 8 she said the Stormwater Department was too busy to prepare a letter for her. On October 11 nothing had been arranged and Mr. Bajor said he would call her back that day. They have a meeting scheduled for October 16. Ms. Slayton said that as of today they have not received a bill for recent improvements made, but she was informed that $1000 would be paid to homeowners for erosion caused by the stormwater issues. She said that the problem has gone on for five months. She then read a portion of a letter received from the Village regarding costs to be paid by her and the Village. She asked if is it Village policy to put homeowners in a position of legal liability. She also invited the Council to attend the meeting in her yard tomorrow. She said it is very frustrating to deal with the stormwater employees.

The Mayor asked the Manager whether the County came out to view the situation. Ms. Slayton said the neighbors were given a permit. The Mayor asked whether it was in compliance with the County Ordinances. He wants that cleared up. She said the County would be there as well.

7. Lori Mosby, 4924 Middaugh, said it has been 12 weeks since she applied for a permit to build a two-car garage where a one-car garage currently exists. They have done what has been required. The Stormwater Department has to calculate the fee. She said the payment of the fee is not a problem. They wanted to complete building the garage this summer. This has been a very lengthy process and the Village is a difficult place to get permits.

8. Jim Stesanisin, 18 6th Street, said they engage in fire pits as it is a recreational event. It would be unreasonable to exclude that. He said he is also present on behalf of Troop 9 of the Boy Scouts because that would hamper their ability to work with the scouts.

He also brought up the issue of the train station at Fairview Avenue. They like to watch the trains and there is a group that hangs out there during the summer who has been drinking and smoking marijuana. There have been people sleeping on the benches and drinking alcoholic beverages. He does not know who is responsible for the train station, but he said it is disappointing to take his children to the station to watch the trains and have to experience this other type of behavior.

9. Bill McKenzie, 1354 Turvey Road, said he was present to speak in favor of the wood burning ordinance amendment. He appreciated the efforts to work on this. He said that one of his neighbors has been in the neighborhood for 76 years. Mr. McKenzie said that many people did not realize that their wood burning was illegal. One of the residents said he bought the material at Wannamaker’s.

10. Paul Kazmierczak, 6006 Hillcrest Court, said he wanted to share his feelings about the recreational aspects of bonfires. It provides an opportunity to spend time with others. He sees no difference between burning wood in a home fireplace and burning outdoors in an approved container.

11. John Kohls, 1032 59th Street, thanked the Council for their fine job. He is opposed to the current ordinance on open burning and was surprised to find that wood burning is illegal. It is good for community spirit and is an option for a life style.

12. Marilynn Gerloff, 4241 Highland, said she sent an e-mail to the Council last Friday about an incident that occurred. She said she didn’t hear back. Ms. Gerloff said she was working the Lion’s Club Candy Day at the Jewel on Ogden Avenue and due to the quality of the air she had to leave. There was a Fire Department controlled burn at Saratoga and she could see the smoke from a distance. Several employees at the Jewel store told her this was the second day this occurred, and most of the remarks she heard from people were negative. Ms. Gerloff said she was amazed that this was allowed to occur in a residential neighborhood. When the wind shifted, she was aware of breathing in the smoky air. Her breathing was being compromised. She said she was amazed that the IEPA would allow this, and asked whether the Fire Department needs permission to do this in a residential neighborhood. Ms Gerloff said one week ago Mr. Baker presented the Council with an agreement regarding Lacey Creek, and that part of that agreement concerned a control burn. Commissioner Schnell asked at that time whether the people in the area were aware of the control burn as it could be a health issue. Ms. Gerloff said this was very polluted air she experienced some distance away from the controlled burn.

Manager Ginex said that the Fire Department had the IEPA permit and it was approved.

Ms. Gerloff said this was near a high school and a residential area and went on for two days for three hours.

The Mayor said they will ask the staff about the IEPA process and the number of training activities a year.

13. Linda Wills, 5521 Brookbank, said she had an asthmatic son; however, she came to speak about the privilege of having woodburning fires. Up until nine months ago he had many problems with asthma and had to use emergency inhalers. He also loved bonfires. He is now on a new physical regimen and is being properly treated and has no emergency situations. She said that if people have asthma issues, there are preventive medicines that will not hamper a person’s ability to enjoy life, including bonfires.

14. Larry Peckhart, 1028 61st Street, said that open burning is a way to promote family values, and this is something that might curb some of the loitering and vandalism.

15. Susie Hornik, 3 Jacqueline Drive, said she wanted to echo many ideas expressed about open fires. She would be devastated if they were banned since she enjoys these fires in the summer months in her back yard with family and friends.

16. David Ziech, 4130 Downers Drive, thanked the Village for considering this ordinance. He said that people should know that this is not a new ordinance, and open burning except for cooking is prohibited. He asked why the ordinance was proposed. He said the Village has a responsibility to the residents to explain the reasons for the original ordinance and this should be a starting point of discussion. Mr. Ziech said his family is constantly subjected to burning of yard waste, garbage and other building materials on an almost daily basis. He said people use the excuse of “cooking” to avoid getting ticketed for a violation. Mr. Ziech said he understands the romance and ambience of a campfire in the proper setting, however the Village is no longer a campground setting. Odors are unpleasant and at worse, toxic. He noted that the proposed amendment would be an improvement and would be enforceable. Mr. Ziech said there are items sold in the Village that cannot by law be used in the Village. He said outdoor burning is the same as an indoor fireplace; however, fireplaces are not usually used for burning garbage, and they emit the smoke about 50’ above ground level. Mr. Ziech said the purpose of the ordinance is to bring order and standards to the Village. Currently, there is no reason not to have a fire in a 55-gallon drum as long as they have food nearby.

Commissioner Gilbert said the impetus of the original ordinance was due to the leaf burning and then trash burning, which was out of control. He added that Webster’s definition of “campfire” is a gathering around a fire for a social purpose. He said he thinks they can reach a compromise in creating the Ordinance. They will have to look to the wording of the materials being used and containers being used. Mr. Ziech said the problem is in defining what is seasoned firewood.

17. John Gibson, 325 6th Street, thanked the Council for their open mindedness in regard go the open burning provisions. He said he doesn’t burn in his backyard, but would do so if allowed. He asked that they carefully consider this issue, and hopes that there will be campfires allowed.

6. Consent Agenda

COR00 -01058 Claim Ordinance: No. 5450, Payroll, October 4, 2002 Sponsors: Accounting A motion was made to Approve this file on the Consent Agenda. Indexes: N/A

BIL00 -01059 List of Bills Payable: No. 5451, October 15, 2002 Sponsors: Accounting A motion was made to Approve this file on the Consent Agenda. Indexes: N/A

BID00 -01069 Bid: 2002/03 Joint Purchase Agreement with the State of Illinois for Roadway Bulk Rock Salt Sponsors: Public Works Summary of Item: Unit price of $29.44/ton with the total purchase not to exceed $126,000.00 without further Council approval. A motion was made to Approve this file on the Consent Agenda. Indexes: Salt

BID00 -01070 Bid: Contract Extension to Global Fire and Environmental Safety Group for Fire Departement Protective Gear for FY 2002 /03 Sponsors: Fire Department and Finance Summary of Item: Not to exceed $5,000.00. A motion was made to Approve this file on the Consent Agenda. Indexes: Fire Equipment, Miscellaneous, Fire Department – Uniforms Passed The Consent Agenda

A motion was made by Commissioner Sisul, seconded by Commissioner Gilbert, that the consent agenda be passed. The motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski

7. Active Agenda

RES00 -01060 Resolution: Approve Annexation Agreements Sponsors: Planning Services Summary of Item: This will authorize annexation agreements for the following properties, with annexation to occur as indicated:

  • 2050 59th Street – January 1, 2006, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 2525 College Road – January 1, 2008, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5904 Janes Avenue – January 1, 2008, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5996 Leonard – January 1, 2008, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5636 Lomond Avenue – January 1, 2008, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 2611 Maple Avenue – January 1, 2008, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 2621 Maple Avenue – January 1, 2008, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5908 Pershing Avenue – January 1, 2006, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5908 Plymouth Street – January 1, 2006, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 6014 Sherman Avenue – January 1, 2006, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5897 Walnut Avenue – January 1, 2008, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5905 Woodward Avenue – January 1, 2006, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.
  • 5915 Woodward Avenue – January 1, 2006, or at time of request by owner, whichever comes first.

A public hearing was held on these agreements on October 1, 2002. No rezoning or other land use approvals have been requested. As such, the properties will come into the Village under our R-1 zoning classification.

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXECUTION OF ANNEXATION AGREEMENTS FOR THE PROPERTIES LOCATED AT 2050 59TH STREET , 2525 COLLEGE ROAD , 5904 JANES AVENUE , 5996 LEONARD , 5636 LOMOND AVENUE , 2611 MAPLE AVENUE , 2621 MAPLE AVENUE , 5908 PERSHING AVENUE , 5908 PLYMOUTH STREET , 6014 SHERMAN AVENUE , 5897 WALNUT AVENUE , 5905 WOODWARD AVENUE , AND 5915 WOODWARD AVENUE

RESOLUTION 2002 -86 A motion was made by Commissioner Sisul, seconded by Commissioner Gilbert, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Annexation/Water Service – 2050 59th Street, Annexation/Water Service – 2525 College Road, Annexation/Water Service – 5904 Janes Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 5996 Leonard, Annexation/Water Service – 5636 Lomond Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 2611 Maple Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 2621 Maple Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 5908 Pershing Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 5908 Plymouth Street, Annexation/Water Service – 6014 Sherman Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 5905 Woodward Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 5915 Woodward Avenue, Annexation/Water Service – 5897 Walnut Avenue

ORD00 -01045 Ordinance: Amend Flag Lot Provisions Sponsors: Plan Commission Summary of Item: This will amend certain flag lot provisions.

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING FLAG LOT PROVISIONS

ORDINANCE NO . 4452 Commissioner Zabloudil said this is a long-standing issue and he is not in favor or support of these flag lots. He thanked the Plan Commission for the thorough job they have done. He said the example of Roslyn Road shows the potential of what will happen if flag lots are allowed to proliferate in the community. The Commissioner said the flag lots served a purpose at one time, however, it creates burdens for the future. He does not want to be associated with the continuation of the flag lots. In the future people will ask why they were allowed. He stated that they need to think about how to raise the bar and create something unique for the community. Those fortunate to have large lots bring open spaces to the community and that should be preserved. It creates a higher standard of development. Flag lots should not be continued as a development or redevelopment tool. They are an incentive to tearing down homes. They must control redevelopment for the benefit of the entire community.

Commissioner Gilbert said he agreed with Commissioner Zabloudil’s comments and would be voting against this provision. He said that flag lots are created only for financial reasons. He has concerns about Fire Department related issues as well. He said that 305’ is not big enough. His opinion is that they should not have been created in the first place.

Commissioner Sisul said that Commissioners Gilbert and Zabloudil have articulated their positions well. He supports the work done by the Plan Commission. He has reviewed the materials and finds that there have been some successful applications executed throughout the community.

Commissioner Schnell echoed Commissioner Sisul’s comments. The Plan Commission worked very hard on this project of whether they should be continuing flag lots in the Village. Many of the flag lots that exist today look good and allow the subdivision to be created. She said that the 305’ was chosen by the original Plan Commission as it narrowed the number of lots that could be created. There are not many lots in town that meet the 305’ requirement. She thinks the lots have been well done and have not created any problems. It is a tool to allow residents to divide their property.

Commissioner McConnell said nothing has been brought up that is different from earlier issues. She said this is an effective tool to use under very limited circumstances and she will support the Resolution.

Commissioner Tully said he is fundamentally opposed to flag lots. He appreciates the work done by the Plan Commission and staff, and noted that there were dissenters on the Plan Commission. He looks at three perspectives 1) aesthetics, 2) safety, and 3) land use. He agrees that aesthetics should not really weight in on this issue. In terms of safety, that is questionable. There are about 64 lots that could be developed in the Village as flag lots. He is not comfortable with the challenges posed to the Fire Department and Police Department by the existence of these lots. He cannot support the idea of flag lot in land use aspects. It was a way to use odd shaped lots in ways they could not use previously, and it has turned into a loop hole for personal profit. Commissioner Tully said this allows a split that could not otherwise take place. He noted that historically, flag lots were not allowed, and this is not a right of the property owner. It was an experiment originally. He said that if someone has a property that they cannot otherwise use, there are existing variances that can be considered. He said he will vote against this, and moves to abolish flag lots.

The Mayor said that the Council is divided 3-3, and his vote comes down to the deciding vote. He thanked the Plan Commission for all of the time they spent on this issue. He said the Plan Commission recommended the current proposal to prohibit buying lots to create flag lots. He does not personally like flag lots. The Village should be in charge of orderly development in the Village. When these were put in place about 13 years ago, there was about one lot approved per year. The Mayor said that one of the concerns regarding the flag lots emanated from safety concerns. However, he said he would be voting in favor of the amendment proposed. He is glad they will be unable to create any more flag lots, but he said he does expect to see more come up again in the future as there are 64 eligible lots. A motion was made, seconded by Commissioner Schnell, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell and Mayor Krajewski Nay: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Tully and Commissioner Zabloudil Indexes: Flag Lots

RES00 -01071 Resolution: Authorize Agreement for Legal Services with Michael F. McMahon Sponsors: Village Attorney Summary of Item: This will authorize execution of an agreement with Michael F. McMahon for the prosecution of DUI violations for the Village in the courts of DuPage County, Illinois, from December 1, 2002 through April 30, 2003.

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXECUTION OF AN AGREEMENT FOR LEGAL SERVICES WITH MICHAEL F . MCMAHON

RESOLUTION 2002 -87 A motion was made by Commissioner Gilbert, seconded by Commissioner Zabloudil, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: DUI Prosecutions

RES00 -01072 Resolution: Authorize Agreement for Legal Services with Linda S. Pieczynski Sponsors: Village Attorney Summary of Item: This will authorize execution of an agreement with Linda S. Pieczynski for the prosecution of Village ordinance violations in the Downers Grove Field Court from December 1, 2002 through April 30, 2003.

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXECUTION OF AN AGREEMENT FOR LEGAL SERVICES WITH LINDA S . PIECZYNSKI

RESOLUTION 2002 -88 A motion was made by Commissioner Zabloudil, seconded by Commissioner Schnell, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Village Prosecutor – Linda Pieczynski

RES00 -01064 Resolution: Authorize Execution of an Intergovernmental Agreement re: Belmont Road Grade Separation Project Sponsors: Manager’s Office Summary of Item: This will authorize an intergovernmental agreement between the State of Illinois Department of Transportation, DuPage County, Burlington Northern and Santa Fe Railway Company, Metra and the Village of Downers Grove for a Grade Separate structure (underpass) at the Belmont Road grade crossing.

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXECUTION OF AN INTERGOVERNMENTAL AGREEMENT

RESOLUTION 2002 -89 A motion was made by Commissioner Schnell to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Metra, Burlington Northern , Belmont Road Grade Separation Project, Belmont Road Underpass

ORD00 -01073 Ordinance: Adopt 2000 International Residential Code Sponsors: Code Services Summary of Item: This will adopt the 2000 International Residential Code and make certain amendments to the Downers Grove Building Code.

AN ORDINANCE ADOPTING THE 2000 INTERNATIONAL RESIDENTIAL CODE

ORDINANCE NO . 4453 A motion was made, seconded by Commissioner Tully, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Building Code, Residential Code

RES00 -01077 Resolution: Authorize Agreement with Conservation Land Stewardship Sponsors: Manager’s Office Summary of Item: This will authorize an agreement between the Village of Downers Grove and Conservation Land Stewardship in the amount of $11,741.10 for landscape management of the restored areas along Lacey Creek.

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXECUTION OF AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE VILLAGE OF DOWNERS GROVE AND CONSERVATION LAND STEWARDSHIP

RESOLUTION 2002 -90 A motion was made by Commissioner Tully, seconded by Commissioner Sisul, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Lacey Creek

RES00 -01078 Resolution: Authorize Agreement with Conservation Land Stewardship – Phase Two Restoration Implementation Sponsors: Manager’s Office Summary of Item: This will authorize an agreement between the Village of Downers Grove and Conservation Land Stewardship in the amount of $11,382.32 for Phase Two Restoration Implementation in certain areas of Lacey Creek.

A RESOLUTION AUTHORIZING EXECUTION OF AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN THE VILLAGE OF DOWNERS GROVE AND CONSERVATION LAND STEWARDSHIP

RESOLUTION 2002 -91 A motion was made by Commissioner Sisul, seconded by Commissioner Gilbert, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Lacey Creek

ORD00 -01079 Ordinance: Amend Fines for Bicycle, Skateboard and Skating Violations Sponsors: Police Department Summary of Item: This will amend those fines charged for skateboard, bicycle and skating violations from $10.00 to $75.00 per occurrence.

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING THE FINES FOR BICYCLE , SKATEBOARD AND SKATING VIOLATIONS

ORDINANCE NO . 4454 Commissioner McConnell said there has been considerable conversation about skateboarding in the downtown area and clearly there have been violations of the Ordinance. When someone is consciously violating something, there are pillars of respect, responsibility and citizenship also being violated. There are some who want to find a constructive solution to the issue; however, it does not make it all right to violate an ordinance.

Commissioner Gilbert said the fastest way to avoid an increase in fines is not to violate the law.

Commissioner Schnell asked whether there is a way to obtain one’s correct name and address if there is a violation.

Village Attorney Petrarca said the violator could be taken to the station and an ID required. Commissioner Schnell said her concern is to find a way to prevent further vandalism downtown.

Commissioner McConnell said that the police officers have the discretion to give a warning to the violator for the first time.

Mayor Krajewski said that what was discussed this evening will be referred to the Park District for skateboarders and cyclists to have an appropriate facility made available. He stressed that skateboarding is illegal in the downtown area and as such violators should be fined. A motion was made by Commissioner Gilbert, seconded by Commissioner Zabloudil, to Adopt this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Bicycle, Skateboard and Skating

ORD00 -01076 Ordinance: Amend Open Burning Restrictions Sponsors: Police Department Summary of Item: This will amend open burning provisions.

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING OPEN BURNING RESTRICTIONS

ORDINANCE NO . 4465 A motion was made by Commissioner Sisul, seconded by Commissioner Gilbert, to Table Indefinitely this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Indexes: Open Burning

MOT00 -01080 Motion: Authorize Exhibit 2 Project Design Option for the Belmont Road Grade Separation Project Sponsors: Manager’s Office Summary of Item: This will authorize Exhibit 2 as the design option plan for the Belmont Road Railroad Grade Separation Project. Commissioner Tully said that it is difficult to vote when there is no choice. This has been a long process where the Village has been represented and there has been public input. He said the Village Manager and the Mayor have advocated on behalf of the residents. This project is needed for safety reasons. He said if they need to authorize this plan to get the ball rolling, then they should do it. He repeated, however, that they have not been given a lot of choice.

The Mayor said that the Village Council will be involved for a number of years to come as to what will take place on this issue. He asked the Village Manager to name a point person from Engineering Department to work on this project.

Commissioner McConnell said she is in favor of tabling this issue for two weeks, until the Village obtains correspondence from Mr. Pagano in writing regarding the northeast corner.

The Mayor asked if Metra will have to work with the Village regarding that. Village Attorney Petrarca said they will have to come to the Village depending upon the zoning.

Commissioner Schnell said she would also prefer to table this for two weeks in an attempt to get some clarifications from Mr. Pagano for the residents and the Council.

The Mayor asked what the questions are they are seeking information on. Commissioner McConnell said she wants clarification regarding the northeast corner for the parking lot. Commissioner Schnell said she would also like clarification regarding the traffic signal – that there will be a traffic signal, and who will be funding it.

The Mayor said that Metra cannot put a light in there. He said the County will have the jurisdiction and will have to put the light in there. Metra does not have jurisdiction of the road, and they would have to talk to the County about the light.

Commissioner Tully asked whether they can afford to delay this issue any longer.

The Mayor said the Council is merely giving its opinion regarding Exhibit 2 versus Exhibit 1. The Village is not giving up its authority regarding permitting. A motion was made by Commissioner Zabloudil, seconded by Commissioner Gilbert, to Authorize this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski Nay: Commissioner Schnell Indexes: Belmont Road Grade Separation Project, Belmont Road Underpass

8. Mayor’s Report

Materials to be Received – Minutes

Library Board – September 25, 2002 Parking & Traffic Commission – August 14, 2002 Plan Commission – August 6, 2002 Public Services Committee – September 3, 2002 Stormwater and Flood Plain Oversight Committee – April 9, 2002 Zoning Board of Appeals – August 28, 2002 Zoning Commission – August 22, 2002 A motion was made by Commissioner Sisul, seconded by Commissioner Gilbert, to Note Receipt Of this file. Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried by the following vote: Votes: Yea: Commissioner Gilbert, Commissioner Sisul, Commissioner Schnell, Commissioner Tully, Commissioner Zabloudil and Mayor Krajewski

Materials to be Received – Monthly Reports

Proclamations

The Mayor declared Saturday, October 26th, as Make A Difference Day in the Village of Downers Grove.

The Mayor proclaimed October 19-27 as Red Ribbon Week in the Village.

Mayor Krajewski proclaimed October 20-26 as Character Counts! Week in the Village of Downers Grove.

9. Manager’s Report

The Manager had no new business to report.

10. Attorney’s Report

Future Active Agenda

ORD00 -00373 Ordinance: Refund of GO Bonds Series 1996 and 2000 Sponsors: Finance Indexes: General Obligation Bond – Refund

11. Committee Standing Reports

Commissioner Zabloudil said the Finance Committee discussed the fund balance policy. It will be coming to the Council for review.

Commissioner Tully said they did not meet but will be continuing their discussion of stormwater resources at their next meeting.

12. Council Member Reports and New Business

Commissioner Tully said that last year the local high school students put together a 9-1-1 Walkathon to raise funds for the victims of the September 11attack. The Downers Grove North High Athletes Committed to Excellence would like to continue the positive attitude of last year’s event and direct the proceeds to the community and local charities. They will have another Walkathon on November 17.

Commissioner McConnell said as part of Character Counts! week there will be several activities. The third annual meeting and training sessions will be held on Friday, October 25. The morning session is the Winning Attitude of Character. The afternoon session will consist of feedback and discussions of the Forty Assets survey. She said both sessions are free to anyone in the community and are being held at the Service Master Aramark. She encouraged people to call 434-5524 for more information.

Commissioner McConnell said that on October 26 there will be a pancake breakfast to raise funds for the Coalition. It will be held at the First United Methodist Church from 7:00 to 11:00 a.m. Tickets are available at Anderson’s Books, Toys on Main , and the Downtown Management Board.

The Mayor added that there will also be a day of window painting for Halloween.

Commissioner Schnell thanked her co-chairman for all the efforts made. She invited everyone to attend these events.

Commissioner Sisul said he enjoyed tonight’s meeting and knows he will miss this. It was good to see so many people in attendance who conducted themselves as well as they did. He said that this was the largest e-mail issue ever. Commissioner Sisul said that the comments from the young people also meant they were concerned enough to come to the meeting and speak their feelings. He further complimented the Commissioners who expressed themselves so well.

Commissioner Sisul also announced that the Lions Club conducted their annual Candy Day over the weekend.

The Mayor said that the Fire Department had its 8th Annual Silent Parade on Friday evening. Cable TV filmed it and will be airing it soon on the Cable station.

He said that on Saturday, he and Commissioners Gilbert and McConnell were at Prince Pond for the designation by the Historical Society of Prince Pond as a Historical Site.

13. Adjournment

Commissioner Sisul moved to adjourn. Commissioner Gilbert seconded.

VOTE : YEA – Commissioners Sisul, Gilbert, Zabloudil, Tully, McConnell, Schnell, Mayor Krajewski

Mayor Krajewski declared the motion carried and the meeting adjourned at 10:22 p.m